Tiffany MellenthinTiffany Mellenthin, RN, joined the St. Louis Children’s Hospital team in 2012 as a nurse on a critical care neonatal/pediatric transport team. In addition to having six years of experience in emergency/critical care, Tiffany also has a 3-year-old daughter. Almost immediately after completing orientation, she encountered a situation that made her realize how life can change in an instant.

I was on my last week of orientation with the transport team in March of 2013 when I met the Mazzola family. My partners and I were dispatched to an outside hospital to pick up a previously healthy little girl who was just diagnosed with a brain tumor. Her name was Abigail, and she was around 3 ½ years old – about the same age as my daughter. That is something that has definitely struck a chord with me since I joined the team: how a child can be ‘fine,’ and then all of the sudden develop this huge problem. It doesn’t seem fair. And the fact that she was so close in age to my daughter hit a little closer to home for me than some of our other calls.

My partners (Erin Juenger and Amy Henschen) and I arrived at the outside hospital to find Abigail finishing her MRI. We spoke to her clearly distraught parents, and tried to do our best to explain what was going to happen next for their family. As a mother, I really felt for Abigail’s parents, and tried to make sure they understood everything we were going to do before we left. Both of Abigail’s parents rode with us to Children’s, and we let her mother ride in the back to stay close to her. Amy and I explained everything we were doing, and what she should expect when she arrived at the PICU. When we arrived at Children’s, multiple things were happening, not only in Abigail’s room, but in other areas of the PICU, as well. I stayed with Abigail’s parents and tried to answer questions the best I could while they settled Abigail into her room.

Abigail leaves St. Louis Children's Hospital after surgery to remove her brain tumorBefore I left the unit, Abigail’s mother came up and hugged me with tears in her eyes. She told me I was an angel, and that we had just saved her daughter’s life. After Abigail’s surgery and while she completed rehab, I made a point to see her, and was amazed at her progress. Right before Abigail was discharged home, she ran up, hugged me, and said, “Thank you.” Those are the types of moments that make me and my wonderful co-workers on the transport team love what we do.

The Mazzolas are an amazing family. They were always at their daughter’s bedside, and have even done some amazing things to pay it forward, raising money for other patients in the hospital. It’s such an incredible thing to know they went through such a traumatic life experience with their daughter, and because of the care that was provided at St Louis Children’s Hospital, they want to turn their experience around and help others.

Working on the transport team, we see families at some of their most vulnerable times. We are sent to pick up children who have suffered a traumatic event of some sort, whether an accident, relapse in a disease, or something unexpected. It reminds me daily that anything can happen at any time, and definitely helps remind me to be thankful that my daughter has so far been healthy. I can’t help but think about how blessed most children are and, more importantly, how things can change in a second.

Abigail’s mother, Erin, recently wrote about the impact Tiffany and the rest of the transport team had on her family:

“One of the transport team members, Tiffany, made it a point to visit Abigail the entire time we were in Children’s.  She had told me that she had a 3-year-old daughter herself and I think was alarmed at our story.  In a way, I think her visits helped her to heal as well, and to close the chapter on her book that everything was going to turn out ok.  I think these people are the ones that are so easily forgotten, but in a way, they are the ones that take you to safety.”

Today, Abigail is doing well. She recently graduated from kindergarten, danced in a recital, and caught a fish with her dad.Today, Abigail is doing well. She recently graduated form kindergarten, participated in a dance recital, and had a successful fishing outing with her dad!